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Dennis Wheatley : The Man Who Missed the War : H/B D/J Novel 1st Edition 1945

Dennis Wheatley : The Man Who Missed the War : H/B D/J Novel 1st Edition 1945

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The Man Who Missed the War

By
Dennis Wheatley

Published by Hutchinson, London 1945. First Edition. Hardback book in dust wrapper. 288 pages.

CONDITION
A good first edition. The dust wrapper remains unclipped and in good condition. The wrapper is protected with a removable mylar sleeve. Boards and spine are good. Endpapers good and inner joints sound. Name written to front endpaper. Pages very good throughout. Overall a very good first edition.

ABOUT THE BOOK

When German submarines were sinking so much Allied shipping that Britain faced the danger of starvation, Dennis Wheatley – then a member of the War Cabinet's Joint Planning Staff – suggested that a system of raft convoys, moved by the Gulf Stream and prevailing winds, should be used to float essential supplies across the Atlantic. This story is based on that idea.

Philip Vaudell leaves the United States on a solitary raft, but when he comes across a ploy that would put him in danger, he casts away from his crew and the raft is left in the lap of the gods.
But, with Philip was the other real trouble – in the enticing shape of red-headed Gloria, who had stowed away on his raft.

Instead of drifting into European waters, they are carried down to the Antarctic where, amidst its eternal snows, he discovers a large area with a warm climate and populated by a lost race. Will they be able to make contact and request rescue, or will they be forced to find a way to integrate with these people? Furthermore, will they be welcomed, or used as part of their ritual human sacrifice?

Dennis Yates Wheatley (8 January 1897 – 10 November 1977) [Born: Dennis Yeats Wheatley] was an English author. His prolific output of stylish thrillers and occult novels made him one of the world's best-selling authors in the 1950s and 1960s.

His first book, Three Inquisitive People, was not immediately published; but his first published novel, The Forbidden Territory, was an immediate success when published in 1933, being reprinted seven times in seven weeks.

He wrote adventure stories, with many books in a series of linked works. His plots covered the French Revolution (Roger Brook Series), Satanism (Duc de Richleau), World War II (Gregory Sallust) and espionage (Julian Day).

In the thirties, he conceived a series of whodunit mysteries, presented as case files, with testimonies, letters, pieces of evidence such as hairs or pills. The reader had to go through the evidence to solve the mystery before unsealing the last pages of the file, which gave the answer. Four of these 'Crime Dossiers' were published: Murder Off Miami, Who Killed Robert Prentice, The Malinsay Massacre, and Herewith The Clues.

In the 1960s his publishers were selling a million copies of his books per year. A small number of his books were made into films by Hammer, of which the best known is The Devil Rides Out (book 1934, film 1968). His writing is very descriptive and in many works he manages to introduce his characters into real events while meeting real people. For example, in the Roger Brook series the main character involves himself with Napoleon, and Joséphine whilst being a spy for the Prime Minister William Pitt. Similarly, in the Gregory Sallust series, Sallust shares an evening meal with Hermann Göring.

He also wrote non-fiction works, including accounts of the Russian Revolution and King Charles II, and his autobiography. He was considered an authority on the supernatural, satanism, the practice of exorcism, and black magic, to all of which he was hostile. During his study of the paranormal, though, he joined the Ghost Club.

From 1974 through 1977 he edited a series of 45 paperback reprints for the British publisher Sphere under the heading "The Dennis Wheatley Library of the Occult", selecting the titles and writing short introductions for each book. This series included both occult-themed novels by the likes of Bram Stoker and Aleister Crowley and non-fiction works on magic, occultism, and divination by authors such as the Theosophist H. P. Blavatsky, the historian Maurice Magre, the magician Isaac Bonewits, and the palm-reader Cheiro.

Two weeks before his death in November 1977, Wheatley received conditional absolution from his old friend Cyril ‘Bobby’ Eastaugh, the Bishop of Peterborough.

His estate library was sold in a catalogue sale by Basil Blackwell's in the 1970s, indicating a thoroughly well-read individual with wide-ranging interests particularly in historical fiction and Europe. His influence has declined, partly due to difficulties in reprinting his works owing to copyright problems.

Fifty-two of Wheatley's novels were published posthumously in a set by Heron Books UK. More recently, in April 2008 Dennis Wheatley's literary estate was acquired by media company Chorion.

He invented a number of board games including Invasion.

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